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Of course, it doesn’t count when women or blacks do it. Part 2.

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Just thought I’d spell this out. So sexism doesn’t exist in the music industry in 2011, huh? Just because it’s institutionalised doesn’t excuse it. 

This is Harvey declaring herself a political animal, calling out to her brethren.

Francis Ford Coppola can lay claim to the war movie. Ernest Hemingway the war novel. Polly Jean Harvey, a 41-year-old from Dorset, has claimed the war album. And like Coppola and Hemingway, she calls it straight: “Death was everywhere/In the air and in the sounds coming off the mounds of Bolton’s Ridge/Death’s anchorage.”

10/10

(Mike Williams, NME, 9 February, 2011)

[Odd Future] is apparently what rebellion sounds like in 2011: dead-eyed, mob-like and opportunistic. There’s certainly no one else currently trying to articulate anything more meaningful in pop culture. Time was when rock stars, and not just the Clash, used to have lots to say about lots of very big, important things. Or so I’m told. The truth is that in my eight years as a music journalist, I’ve never found one.

So now no one says anything at all. And then we all wake up and wonder where the art of genuine protest has gone.

(Krissi Murison, editor of NME, writing in The Guardian, 14 August 2011)

I would like to know quite when the editor of the NME stopped counting women as legitimate rock stars.

Here are the two other related blog entries:

Where has the art of genuine protest gone? asks a ‘concerned’ music industry insider
Of course, it doesn’t count when women or blacks do it. A collection of 20 present-day political pop songs

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